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Posts Tagged ‘ethics’

Faith

January 11, 2010 2 comments

Just a couple thoughts this morning.  I’ve let them stew for a while, so hopefully they don’t come out burnt and crispy.  Regardless of the final product, I feel like some things just ought to be addressed for the sake of avoiding stagnation and eventual spiritual decay.

Now, as I dig into the stew pot of thoughts, my wonderings this morning are as follows; what is faith?  And what does it mean to trust in God?

Here’s the premise by which I am asking these two questions.  I am convinced that as a follower of Christ, my life MUST be a life of action.  Thus, if I stand on that conviction, I find a disconnect within the language and behavior of the majority of the population that claims a Christian label.  Bear with me as I attempt to clean up the assertion a bit.

In addressing the first question, what is faith?  If this question was to be pointed anywhere near a child of the evangelical movement, most certainly, this verse would be quoted:

Now faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain what we do not see.  Hebrews 11:1

Often, that’s how we define faith, yet we have great difficulty defining it in physical and active terms.  The following verses in Hebrews highlight the lives of a host of biblical personalities that “by faith” lived differently.  Here is the first disconnect: We don’t equate faith with action as did the saints in Hebrews.  Faith, in western Christianity is an irrefutable definition by which we believe the right things. Faith has no bearing on the way we live our lives from day to day.

I would also argue that the same is true when we throw around the etherial concept of “trusting in God.”  Quite often we assert that we are to trust God’s will.  Yet in our way of defining that trust, we load all responsibility for the condition of our lives on a God to whom we believe will intervene for poor me, taking away the duty I have as a follower of Christ, to ACT for good in this world.  Moreover, we often say things like, “we need to trust God and avoid distracting ourselves by trying to figure it out on our own.”  But, what does a statement like that really mean?  Are we to assume that making a conscious decision to believe differently is really going to smooth out all the wrinkles?

What if God is hidden within our struggle to figure things out?  Disengaging the critical thinking centers of our minds, whether trusting God or not, seems to be a step in the wrong direction.  Furthermore, if we step back and make an honest assessment of ourselves,  isn’t it true that we inevitably decide to heed certain things and avoid others, taking one path over another?  So, why is it that God isn’t allowed to work in our struggle?  There are so many instances in which our fixation on an intervening God freezes us in complacency.  The best we can do is sit and wait for him to do his stuff.  When, I would argue, there’s something sacred happening all the time and it’s a waste of time to sit and wait.

As I reflect on this post, it’s difficult for me to accept the fact that what is most likely happening is that as I work through all these difficulties, I am probably projecting my own insecurities onto people around me.  I’m upset with the way things are, and so I point the finger at someone else because it’s much easier to do that than to make the necessary change in my own life.

That being said, and unfortunately, as I’ve said many times before, I aim to live differently.  There’s a song that says something like, “This world is not my home, I’m just a passin through.”  This world may not be my home, but I firmly believe that God, however we want to understand him/her/it, has a desire for us to join the sacred work that is already happening.  I believe I have been given the opportunity to make this world what it is intended to be.  No longer will I believe that is true, but I will LIVE like it’s true.

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Separation

May 31, 2009 1 comment

I’ve been keeping up with a very intriguing conversation via Facebook with some new friends of ours.  I’ll briefly let you in on the topic.  Last Thursday night there was  a gathering of people discussing the implications of the separation of church and state.  Unfortunately, my wife and I were unable to attend the meeting since we’d had very little sleep the night before.  Needless to say, as you might imagine, the conversation following the originally purposed question about opinions on matters of church and state quickly got intense.  Most of the comments were cordial enough, outside of a couple missiles fired from the “religious” camp.

As my wife and I consider our calling and participation in the reconciliation of this world back to it’s Creator, it got us thinking.  In our minds, the idea of holiness was rolling around in our minds and my wife, out of the blue, asked, “what is the original Greek meaning of the word ‘holy’?”  I dug deep in the recesses of my mind, searching for a definition.  Separation.  Set apart. Both excellent descriptions.  Biblical descriptions at that.  However, we both had a feeling there must be more.  Now, here’s the meat.

note: those of you who are Christians reading this, I am primarily writing to you, because that’s what I know, it has become who I am.  At some point, we are going to have to wake up and smell the roses, or as is most often the case, smell our own hypocrisy.

We (Christians) believe we are called to be a reflection of Christ, a holy people.  Typically, I would have described that charge as relating to piety, or being pious.  As I mentioned before, both the Hebrew (qodesh) and Greek (hagios) have been translated as holy, hallowed, sanctified or sometimes sacred.  More literal translations describe being set apart or separate.  But, get this.  In Hebrew, there is a word used to describe a harlot or whore.  qedeshah. And the male prostitute, or sodomite: qadesh. Both of these words are derivatives of the Hebrew word qodesh.  Now, if that doesn’t throw a wrench in your gears, there’s not hope for you to ever be what God intended for you to be.  For the rest of us, who now realize that we really don’t have anything figured out, think about the implications.

It brings a totally different meaning to the common Christian phrase, “you’ve been bought with a price.”  Spend some time considering what this means for your relationship with God.  But, I want to spend just a moment and go back to the conversation I mentioned above.

Consider this.  How is a whore or a sodomite treated?  How much say does that person have in their relationships?  Now, please don’t start thinking negatively, because it is entirely too easy to do so.  Keep the positive ere please.  If we are to be holy, qedeshah/qadesh, whore, set apart, separate, why in the world do we spend so much time arguing with people about silly things like the separation of church and state?  Why do we as so called Christ followers, resort to violence and oppression (both figuratively and literally) every time we enter into one of these conversations?  The “ultimate love of God” comes across as little more than a judgemental, ugly, I’m-better-than-you-are attitude that in no way pours out the true love God wants his people to experience.  Do we as Christian people honestly think we have the right to say whatever we want?  I vaguely remember scripture saying something about putting aside your “rights…”

I could probably go on and on, but I’ll call it quits and end with this.  As I told my friends just today, I am sorry for the evils we (my Christian brothers and sisters) have cause in the world.  I am sorry that we continue to live blindly in hypocrisy, elevating ourselves above everyone else.

I am a follower of Christ.  I don’t know all the answers.  I’m a hypocrite and a pharisee.  I’m still learning and growing and I thank God each and every day for the grace he pours out on me.  If only I can learn to be so gracious.  Teach me; for the sake of this world…